Accidental Impulse

adventitious, aimless, aleatory, arbitrary, capricious, chance, desultory, discretionary, fickle, fortuitous, gratuitous, haphazard, hazarded, hit-or-miss, impulsive, indiscriminate, intermittent, occasional, purposeless, sporadic, stochastic, stray, unplanned, and wanton

"Some are born with busts, some are born with butts, but whatever makes you feel confident and like loving yourself more, be proud. I’m all for it. ”

(Source: missyperegrym, via tarynel)

And so, being young and dipped in folly
I fell in love with melancholy

—Edgar Allan Poe (via books-rome-weirdness)

  • me: *sniffs air*
  • me: ah september
  • me: the time where bugs die
  • me: and tv shows gradually return from hiatus
  • me: aaah
animalworld:

GLASS FROGS and EGGSHyalinobatrachium valerioi ©Elke Vockenhuber
Hyalinobatrachium valerioi is a species of frog in the Centrolenidae family. It is found in Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, and Panama. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, rivers, and heavily degraded former forest. It is threatened by habitat loss. Source
Glass frogs are mostly arboreal. They live along rivers and streams during the breeding season, and are particularly diverse in montane cloud forests of Central and South America.
The eggs are usually deposited on the leaves of trees or shrubs hanging over the running water of mountain streams, creeks, and small rivers. One species leave its eggs over stones close to waterfalls. The method of egg-laying on the leaf varies between species. The males usually call from leaves close to their egg clutches. The eggs are less vulnerable to predators than those laid within water, but can be affected by parasitic fly species. As a result, some glass frogs show parental care. After they hatch, the tadpoles fall into the waters below. The tadpoles are elongated, with powerful tails and low fins, suited for fast flowing water. Outside of the breeding season some species live in the canopy. Source
Other posts you may like:
Red-eyed Tree frog Embryos
Pygmy Marsupial Frog - carries tadpole in pits on her back
Suriname Toad - video
—-
speednacer:

One of the coolest things I’ve ever seen.  GLASS FROGS <3

animalworld:

GLASS FROGS and EGGS
Hyalinobatrachium valerioi
©Elke Vockenhuber

Hyalinobatrachium valerioi is a species of frog in the Centrolenidae family. It is found in Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, and Panama. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, rivers, and heavily degraded former forest. It is threatened by habitat loss. Source

Glass frogs are mostly arboreal. They live along rivers and streams during the breeding season, and are particularly diverse in montane cloud forests of Central and South America.

The eggs are usually deposited on the leaves of trees or shrubs hanging over the running water of mountain streams, creeks, and small rivers. One species leave its eggs over stones close to waterfalls. The method of egg-laying on the leaf varies between species. The males usually call from leaves close to their egg clutches. The eggs are less vulnerable to predators than those laid within water, but can be affected by parasitic fly species. As a result, some glass frogs show parental care. After they hatch, the tadpoles fall into the waters below. The tadpoles are elongated, with powerful tails and low fins, suited for fast flowing water. Outside of the breeding season some species live in the canopy. Source

Other posts you may like:

Red-eyed Tree frog Embryos

Pygmy Marsupial Frog - carries tadpole in pits on her back

Suriname Toad - video

—-

speednacer:

One of the coolest things I’ve ever seen.  GLASS FROGS <3

animalworld:

WHY ZEBRAS DEVELOPED STRIPES?Equus zebra©Edgar Angelone, Smithsonian Magazine Photo Contest
Researchers from Hungary and Sweden claim to have solved the mystery of zebra stripes. The stripes, they say, came about to keep away blood-sucking flies.
"We started off studying horses with black, brown or white coats," explained Susanne Akesson from Lund University, a member of the international research team that carried out the study.
"We found that in the black and brown horses, we get horizontally polarised light," making dark-coloured horses very attractive to flies. The light that bounces off the horse’s dark coat - and travels in waves to the eyes of a hungry fly - moves along a horizontal plane, like a snake. Horseflies, or tabanids, were very attracted by these "flat" waves of light.
"From a white coat, you get unpolarised, light [reflected]," she explained. Unpolarised light waves scatter along any plane, and are much less attractive to flies. As a result, white-coated horses are much less troubled by horseflies than the dark colored horses. 
Having discovered the flies’ preference for dark coats, the team then became interested in zebras. What kind of light would bounce off the striped body of a zebra?
We painted different patterns onto boards,” then placed a blackboard, a whiteboard, and several boards with stripes of varying widths into the fields of a horse farm in rural Hungary. “We put insect glue on the boards and counted the number of flies that each one attracted.” 
The striped board that most closely match to the pattern of a zebra’s coat attracted the fewest flies, “even less than the white boards”. “That was a surprise because, in a striped pattern, you still have these dark areas that are reflecting attractive horizontally polarised light. 
To test horseflies’ reaction to a more realistic 3-D target, the team put four life-size “sticky horse models ” into the field - one brown, one black, one “zebra-striped”. The researchers collected the trapped flies every two days, and found that the zebra-striped horse model attracted the fewest. Source
Other posts you might like:
Another Zebra Stripe Theory
Zebra Facts
Why Horses Sleep Standing Up?

animalworld:

WHY ZEBRAS DEVELOPED STRIPES?
Equus zebra
©
Edgar Angelone, Smithsonian Magazine Photo Contest

Researchers from Hungary and Sweden claim to have solved the mystery of zebra stripes. The stripes, they say, came about to keep away blood-sucking flies.

"We started off studying horses with black, brown or white coats," explained Susanne Akesson from Lund University, a member of the international research team that carried out the study.

"We found that in the black and brown horses, we get horizontally polarised light," making dark-coloured horses very attractive to flies. The light that bounces off the horse’s dark coat - and travels in waves to the eyes of a hungry fly - moves along a horizontal plane, like a snake. Horseflies, or tabanids, were very attracted by these "flat" waves of light.

"From a white coat, you get unpolarised, light [reflected]," she explained. Unpolarised light waves scatter along any plane, and are much less attractive to flies. As a result, white-coated horses are much less troubled by horseflies than the dark colored horses. 

Having discovered the flies’ preference for dark coats, the team then became interested in zebras. What kind of light would bounce off the striped body of a zebra?

We painted different patterns onto boards,” then placed a blackboard, a whiteboard, and several boards with stripes of varying widths into the fields of a horse farm in rural Hungary. “We put insect glue on the boards and counted the number of flies that each one attracted.”

The striped board that most closely match to the pattern of a zebra’s coat attracted the fewest flies, “even less than the white boards”. “That was a surprise because, in a striped pattern, you still have these dark areas that are reflecting attractive horizontally polarised light.

To test horseflies’ reaction to a more realistic 3-D target, the team put four life-size “sticky horse models ” into the field - one brown, one black, one “zebra-striped”. The researchers collected the trapped flies every two days, and found that the zebra-striped horse model attracted the fewest. Source

Other posts you might like:

Another Zebra Stripe Theory

Zebra Facts

Why Horses Sleep Standing Up?